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Verre et verriers pp14-15 by Majnouna Verre et verriers pp14-15 by Majnouna
For Verre et Verriers, book #11 in our Lebanese Heritage series.
The glass industry explodes during the Roman period, where the invention of blown glass (in the Lebanon, probably in Sidon) makes this material (relatively) affordable and accessible to all :D
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:iconxangelofdeath:
xAngelOfDeath Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Student Artist
Waah, c'est super interessant tout ca!
Les dessins sont tres jolis ^^
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Professional General Artist
Merci! ^^
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:iconseifertacko:
seifertacko Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2010
Really is nice if i can understand,just a bit is enough..coz im just amazed by starin' at those drawing,almost like my early age history book..
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2010  Professional General Artist
Aww, thanks!
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:iconseifertacko:
seifertacko Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2010
nostalgic u can say..hehehehe..brings back ol' memories..
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:iconschoolbell:
schoolbell Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2010  Student Filmographer
Eh c'est vrai pour les lacrimaires ?! je ne savais pas ! j'adore tes dessins, plus particulièrement celui avec le gars qui se tartine le bras avec les filles en arrière ! :D
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2010  Professional General Artist
Eh oui c'est vrai! Merci :D
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:iconziannna:
Ziannna Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2010
I don't know any French (and my Latin is only useful if I had a French dictionary >>)... so these were all common uses for glass in the Roman empire? Cool! =D

Also, I love the beads on the lower right corner! I have a bunch like the black&white ones, only in different colors.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jun 20, 2010  Professional General Artist
They came into use during the Roman Empire, yes, when the Phoenicians created the technology to make glass more easily and in larger quantities :)
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:iconziannna:
Ziannna Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2010
Now I need to go to more bead history research because I wonder if the technology came from Phoenicia or India? Just like "Arabic" number notation is actually Indian... Anywho, thank you! =D
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2010  Professional General Artist
Glass paste certainly came from either Egypt or Mesopotamia and blown glass certainly came from Phoenicia. Arabic numerals (1234 etc) certainly came from the Arabic script, where they were actual letters, but the Arabic script itself picked up Sanskrit numerals along the way.
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:iconziannna:
Ziannna Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2010
So glass-making just spread eastwards through the Middle East and then India? (I'm pretty sure Indonesia got glass beads from India...) And that would be why Arabic script doesn't look like other Semetic languages? Hee, I didn't know that, thank you!!
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2010  Professional General Artist
Yes, and westward too :)
Oh no, Arabic does look like other semitic scripts. All scripts descended from the phoenician are basically similar when you look carefully at them. It's just the numbers that stand out.
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:iconziannna:
Ziannna Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2010
[Wow, sorry this reply is so late ^^;;;;;]
I guess that's because we're so familiar with them -- they would probably look more exotic if we didn't see them all the time =D. I guess I just haven't looked hard enough -- I still can't see the Hebrew in the Arabic forms *sigh*
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2010  Professional General Artist
You're not going to see it, they both derived independently from the Phoenician.
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:iconalene:
Alene Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2010  Professional General Artist
I love looking at these (and staggering through them with my schoolgirl French =P) because there's always so much to see and to learn, and they're always so cute and visually appealing. =)
I did have a little trouble realising that the *note beneath the little man and his admirers was connected not only to that passage, but also to the * on the other page, beneath the girl washing the dishes. Its placement makes it look a little exclusive, if that makes sense.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner May 25, 2010  Professional General Artist
Very late reply, but I took that into account when I finalized. I removed one of the stars, it was just simpler that way!
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:iconelfbiter:
elfbiter Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
IIRC, the contemporary glass was still mainly colored and not transparent.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2010  Professional General Artist
IIRC?
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:iconelfbiter:
elfbiter Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
"If I Recall/Remember Correctly". Newgroups shorthand at the time...
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2010  Professional General Artist
Oh! No, manganese oxyde had been known for a while (to discolor glass) and blown glass achieved transparency (though not to the degree achieved in Venice much later, when they created "crystal"), but colorless glass just wasn't always fashionable, so it was often colored. It was indisputably see-through though, and there are plenty of perfectly colorless objects dating from that period.
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:iconelfbiter:
elfbiter Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
Ah. Maybe I was preccupied with the fact transparents window glasses are post-medieval development.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2010  Professional General Artist
They were invented in Roman times, actually (though they didn't know how to polish them yet), but it took about a thousand years for glazed windows to catch on in civilian architecture :)
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:iconelfbiter:
elfbiter Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
Hmm. I was running a bronze-age roleplaying game for a decade and assumed that there was only opaque, decorative glass...
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2010  Professional General Artist
The roman period is far later than the bronze age =P
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(1 Reply)
:iconsraffa:
SRaffa Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Professional General Artist
Fascinating and beautifully designed; exemplary work...
:+fav:
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Professional General Artist
You're always so sweet :hug:
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:iconsraffa:
SRaffa Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Professional General Artist
I'm a grumpy old man; you're just extremely good at what you do. :hug:
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:iconkestrelwings:
KestrelWings Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ahahaha, I like the facial expression on the dishwashing girl. xD Oh gosh it's been too long since I've had French class...*tries to read*
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2010  Professional General Artist
Hehehe sorry!
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:iconcozie:
Cozie Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
I wonder how much one gets paid to be a professional funeral weeper? :aww:
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2010  Professional General Artist
Hehe good question!
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:iconzatona:
Zatona Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
c'est tres clair, j'aime beaucoup.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2010  Professional General Artist
Chouette, merci beaucoup! (avec beaucoup de retard!)
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:icongrublord:
GrubLord Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010
The dude with the oil looks so smug. :)

I love your scrapbooky style in these childrens' works. Very, very nice.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2010  Professional General Artist
Thanks very much!
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:iconrufious:
rufious Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Hihi la tête de le femme qui fait la vaisselle me horriblement rire. Ca n'a toujours pas changé :D
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2010  Professional General Artist
:lmao: C'est genre: "L'invention de la vaisselle hein? Ouais super...not =P"
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