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One of the most frequently asked questions on this site is the infamous: "Is there a point in going to Art School?" It makes my blood pressure rise every time, not so much the question itself as the fact it is asked to, and answered by, people who have no business giving advice on the matter. This article seeks to answer it once and for all, and be warned that it may come across as cutting in certain places. There's a link to my CV in my journal for those who might wonder about my own qualifications.

The short answer is: Yes, there is a point. In fact, if you want to make a carreer out of art, or design, you must go to art school. You can dispense from it if one of the following applies to you:
:pointr: You're a genius in your chosen field. You have an innate grasp of art/design principles and the ability to impose your ideas in the field so that you don't even need to learn the nitty-gritty. Unlikely, or you'd be famous by now.
:pointr: You need a formation but you have the vision and discipline necessary to get one as complete as a school would provide on your own. If that were the case however, you certainly wouldn't be asking The Question.
:pointr: You have no intention of making a carreer out of art or design but just want to dabble with either on the side.

If you recognise yourself in one of the above (without lying to yourself; "my friends say I draw amazing fan art without having learned how" or "I know where to look for tutorials" certainly don't qualify), no need to read on.

Now here are reasons why you should go if you're serious about art. Notice "getting a degree" is not even on the list.

1. Learning.
Is it actually possible to believe that people get a higher education just to get a piece of paper that says they know something they could have learned on their own? What kind of hippie reactionism is that? We go to school to learn, people, not because someone is forcing us to, but because we care about our field, want to know everything we can about it, and actually improve in it! Here are a few things about learning:
:pointr: There is a lot to learn, about many media and within each medium, conceptually and technically. And no better place to find it all concentrated than a good art/design school.
:pointr: You will never learn as much on your own as you will learn in school. Never. You are one brain where school offers you many, and you only have one life where school allows you start from the sum of knowledge amassed by many masters over many lives. If you insist on spending 10 years learning something you could have learned in one course in school, that's your funeral. Other people are more interested in exploring something new than in reinventing the wheel.
:pointr: Moreover, and I see this in every amateur on this site and elsewhere, in every first year student: you have no idea how little you know until you enter the major. So it's not like you can look up everything on your own: there are things you don't even know you should look up. You wouldn't question the necessity to go to engineering school, yet you can find written material about every aspect of it. Not so with the arts, where much of the teaching is subtle and can be only transmitted indirectly (you can't be taught to design, you can only be guided towards it). Yet you don't think a structured training is necessary for a discipline that can't be pinned on paper?
:pointr: In school you do not only learn. You become. The curriculum deconstructs the way you think and reconstructs your mind for the purpose of art. That is what sets a professional apart from an amateur. An amateur will always be "doing art". A professional is hardwired for it. It's not something you can even comprehend until you've been through it. That's what a formation is about.

2. Discipline.
Discipline is not self-imposed. It must be imposed from the outside. You'd have to be exceptionally iron-willed to put yourself through what we go through in school: the endless readings, the tight deadlines, the projects you really don't feel like working on, the redos that drive you nuts, the competition, the overnights, the imposed subjects, etc. I don't think it's humanly possible. I'm extremely disciplined and driven, yet after I graduated, and despite really wanting to, I never once re-read the school notes I had promised myself to read. And so one misses out. Self-taught people have the natural tendency to go straight for what they want to learn. They don't take sidetrips. But it is the sidetrips that feed your skill and give you an edge. An elective in psychology for instance can inject wonders into your work.
I see some very skilled self-taught artists with one large weakness that betrays the fact they received no education: they can only do one thing. They have one style, one medium. They may be very good but it gets boring for everyone, it gets outfashioned quickly, and it's a dangerous situation on a professional level. An art career, or a freelance design career, is a gamble: you make it safer by being versatile and able to answer any commission. Such versatility comes from being forced to do things you would not choose to do on your own, and exposed to ideas you would normally not be interested in. Think about it next time you turn up your nose at a teacher that forces you to step away from your cherished style...

3. Mentoring.
If you think getting feedback on dA helps you improve, imagine getting monitored and mentored daily by experienced, active professionals who can spot your weaknesses and know how to make you work through them. People who can evaluate your work not based on personal preference, nor even solely against a set of art principles, but in the context of the past and current art scene. Who can train your mind alongside your skills and show you how to marry concept and execution. Whose contacts in the real world can take you far. Who can force you to create a future for yourself with your skills instead of wasting them on something that will never get you anywhere in life. Or did you really think college teachers are just fossils that they keep around to keep anime drawers out?

4. Exchange.
Taking classes implies classmates. Setting aside how much more fun it is when you have road companions, think of them as extensions to your creativity. They are the ones who will come up with stuff you would never have thought of, and vice-versa. They're the ones who will look at your work and, empowered by their intimate acquaintance with it (after the first couple of years, you'll be able to spot each other's style a mile off, for life), suggest fixes or give you wild ideas, to complement the more realistic approach of the teachers. They're the ones who make the learning and experimenting fun and the worst chores (like creating a Munsell solid) bearable. You will learn from their mistakes and from their successes, and you can experiment on them, as well as enroll their help when in dire need of extra arms.

5. Connections.
During your scholarship, you will participate in workshops, attend lectures, go on field trips, be sent on internships, enter department-wide or nationwide competitions, meet professionals, handle small freelance jobs. By the time you graduate, you will have a foot in design circles, a useful list of connections, and enough professionals should have heard your name to give you a start in your career. People in art school typically don't have to worry about ending up jobless.

6. Credibility
Potential employers rarely ask to see a degree. They prick up their ears, though, at the mention of your school, especially if it's a reputable one. Here's what the fact you graduated from art school tells them on the spot:
:pointr: Your skills have been tested and recognised by art professionals, who will vouch for you upon request.
:pointr: You are familiar with the workings of the system and the details it is your job to know.
:pointr: You can make a deadline.
:pointr: You can work under pressure.
:pointr: You have professional standards for quality and pricing.
:pointr: You can do the best job for them their money can buy
And so on.
Someone without an official education is at a disadvantage, because no client wants to invest time into verifying all the above about you, as they would have to do since nobody else can vouch for you (unless you come in with a letter of recommendation from someone reputable, but how are you going to reach such a person in the first place if you're not introduced by the school body?) An amazing portfolio may not be enough, because the other factors (speed, reliability etc) are just as important. They may choose to take the chance, but they won't pay you the same. Very few people will pay professional rates to someone untrained, because for that amount of money they can hire someone with much more credibility. See the catch? You may end up spending your life doing mediocre jobs for cheap clients. Your chances of breaking into the higher circles, where the best in art and design take place, are slim at best if you're on your own.

7. Equipment.
Where else are you going to be able to experiment with so many media without spending a fortune? Our design (not even art) department put at our disposal, to name a few, work spaces, fully equipped etching and silkscreen rooms, a photo lab, a computer lab, projectors, digital cameras when they were not so readily available, and, of course, an enormous library. We also got student discounts on art supplies and printing services.

I can think of more, but 7 is a good number to end at.

In conclusion, here's a suggestion to those who seek advice on the forums: Don't. When something may potentially determine your path in life, you should ask only people you can trust. People who have been there and can respond based on solid personal experience. I see too many deviants responding with the completely cliché and shallow "you don't need a degree,all that matters is your skill" while they are not even of age to go to art school yet. Do you look up the info of those who give you such advice, to make sure they are actually over 13 and have a clue what they're saying? You should. As for the advice-givers: unless you are an art student with some insights to share, or better yet a successful professional with solid arguments to contribute on either side, show some responsibility and abstain. Whether you're well-meaning and naive or plain arrogant, you are causing more harm than good.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconneketti:
Neketti Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2015  Student General Artist
It's been my dream since I was little to go to an art school an have an art career...but I've always been scared that once I graduate and complete school I'll be lost with no where to go. I hear many mixed reviews of an art career- that most people end up being freelancers. I know how hard freelancing can be to pay the bills, and it's very hard to get popular...I just need to know...is it a realistic career to live off of?
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2015  Professional General Artist
If you're hesitant about an art career then it's probably not for you. To make it work, you have to really want it, and people who really want it are not put off by potential difficulty. You have to decide if you're going to follow your fears or your dreams.
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:iconneketti:
Neketti Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2015  Student General Artist
That's not a very optimistic response, but I guess it's the truth I need. I just wanted to see a glimmer of hope, counting the odds, and hoping that that the people who make it is not just by random chance, that the great artists out there are not just figment of false dreams. If it's determination that makes one truly succeed, then I'll do my best, and just pray that with effort I won't be pushed off into some unknown sea. My confidence has been built up a bit by Disney Dreamers Academy...so with a bit more encouragement I may be able to make something with this talent...
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2015  Professional General Artist
Of course it's not by random chance. It's hard work and being true to what makes one's work unique.
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:iconamygda1a:
Amygda1a Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Okay, I see what you're saying. I am considering art school myself, but I am highly worried it's too late. I'm a junior in high school, and have just in the past two months found out that this is what I want to do. This means my skill is not where it should be if I wanted to take this seriously. That said, I have made myself draw as much as possible, and my improvement has been pretty good. I know I have the drive and the discipline (very serious musician as well) to do it, I'm just very worried if I try to follow this path, which is the one I want to take, then I'll be horribly left behind, hell, I'm worried I might not get good enough before applications next year to make it in. What do you think?
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2015  Professional General Artist
I would need to know you much better before venturing to give advice. I'll just say this, if you need more time, there's nothing wrong with taking a year off to get where you want to be.
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:iconpalowsky:
palowsky Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I felt really discouraged after reading through this, simply because to me it comes off as artistic explorers are lost and are in need to be like everyone else. I would rather keep doing what I love and get praised by those that see my stuff. And if I do get harsh criticism from my work, it would be really difficult to rise above it. (I'm an Aspie, but don't see this as an excuse)
And there are exceptions; successful artists I admire who never attended art schools. Even some of the old greats are self-taught, and look at their work.
Sorry, but I would rather be a happy artist who would rather forge his own path to success than have to change for others.
None of this is bad. I'm just counterpointing by explaining artistic diversity.
 
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:iconbirch-bark:
birch-bark Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
I've looked up the education history of artists that I admire. Some went to "good" art schools, some went to state colleges, some are self-taught. As long as you're passionate and dedicated, there's no reason you can't be a successful artist without someone pushing you. Don't believe everything you read ;)
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:iconladywolfcat:
LadyWolfcat Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you 
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2015  Professional General Artist
Welcome!
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:iconll-corah-sage-ll:
ll-Corah-Sage-ll Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Student Digital Artist
No offense btw, from that last post I sent ^-^
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Professional General Artist
None taken.
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:iconll-corah-sage-ll:
ll-Corah-Sage-ll Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Whatever floats your boat then ^_^
I just know I enjoy the power to influence or persuade others :)
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2014  Professional General Artist
Haha that's honest!
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:iconll-corah-sage-ll:
ll-Corah-Sage-ll Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Student Digital Artist
If you're open to some friendly critique...don't get so emotionally passionate (it leads to being critical, snide, and sarcastic, and that will only make people raise their defenses), just use more objective logic, unless of course your goal is to piss off and deter those who believe differently while getting people who already agree with you to side with you and support you. Basically, if you want to actually convince others with a different view, remove yourself from your emotions or they'll reject your views...even if you did have valid and reasonable points. Removing yourself from the emotion also forces you to completely confront points with greater logic. If I were a skeptic on going to school for art and leaned more towards NOT going, I'd find this not only unconvincing, but also somewhat insulting and stupid.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Professional General Artist
Happily, I don't give a damn who gets pissed off or unconvinced :) Emotion is good in my book.
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:iconartkayz:
ArtKayz Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2014  Student General Artist
This was well written and very concise. Thank you. I've known I wanted to be an Artist for a while now- I just wasn't sure if I was actually going to attend art school or not. This has made me sure. I'm going for something that won't give me any- or a lot- of debt, (a one or two year course at most) so that I can get all of these experiences quickly without a huge burden to carry around.

Again, thanks. :)
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2014  Professional General Artist
Great, good luck!
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:iconemchompski:
EmChompski Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Thank you for this! I've always wanted to go to school for art, so that I can make money doing something that I'm passionate about. This really helped me decide, once and for all. You made really good points, too.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2014  Professional General Artist
Cool :)
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Hidden by Owner
:iconlushmindawolf:
LushmindaWolf Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
eep xD wrong comment sorreh
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:iconlushmindawolf:
LushmindaWolf Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
what school did you go to?
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:iconherona101:
herona101 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Dude, I completely understand how you feel about not feeling confident about your art skills and being unsure whether or not art is the pathway to pursue. I'm a college freshman and I'm not majoring in Art, but I still practice drawing whatever comes to mind. For me, I haven't really taken any serious art classes and I know that my work isn't exactly top-notch. But if you really want this dream of becoming an artist, I believe you can do it! It's really harsh to compare your work with others' work and expect immediate improvement. Definitely, art is meant to be a time-consuming project, and that requires a lot of dedication, perseverance, and patience. 

Believe me, I've been frustrated several times with my artwork to the extent that I stopped drawing for awhile and considered just never making a sketch again. But now I realize that I was not being patient with myself and needed to explore my own art style, instead of degrading my artwork compared to another's. Although I've never taken AP Art, I know a couple of friends from high school who did and experienced similar problems, such as staying up late hours struggling to finish several art pieces that were overdue and being self-conscious/depressed about their work. I know we all sort of lower our self-esteem because it's easy to nit-pick the flaws in ourselves, but it's just not the right attitude if you continuously do so. Instead, set aside your anxieties and doubts and do the best with what you can! 

I know that I'm not exactly the best artist to be inspired by, but I hope that whatever I just typed will help you get through this predicament, and ultimately, let you know that you're not alone! Keep trying, and even if you don't decide to pursue art as a career, know that you'll always have art when you most need it. :)
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Professional General Artist
All I can really say is good luck!
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:iconlagniprimatte:
Lagniprimatte Featured By Owner May 3, 2014
Hey, do you mind removing my comment haha.

It was a bit melodramatic and it worked out.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Professional General Artist
Ok :)
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:iconluna9210:
Luna9210 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Hi, I'm a senior in High school and I just want to say thank you soo much. I never even considered an art career until 7th grade when i switched band for an art elective. It was really life changing.. And since then I've heard all kinds of different things about going or not going to an art school. I really want to go and i always have, especially for the learning experiences but alot of people tell me i'm wasting my time with it and it's depressing. I really don't want to give up and what you wrote has helped me prove my argument that much more, so thank you! 
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2013  Professional General Artist
Great :)
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:iconlizbjordal:
lizbjordal Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist

Thank you for your honest response to such an inevitable question... I am about to graduate from a Liberal Arts school with a degree in Philosophy and Spanish. While I am very happy with my decision to study these subjects, I cannot help but feel that I have neglected the youthful artist in my mind. Years ago, I was fiercely dedicated to studying art in college; instead, I took the opportunity to travel (everywhere).

 

Now, I want to go to art but have no clue where to begin. I have some talent but have not practiced in some time. I lack discipline and training, so where do I start? Do you have any advice for a rusty yet ambitious amateur?

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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2013  Professional General Artist
Yes, start drawing! And whenever you hit a weakness, you can look more closely into that.
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:iconrosane-chawi:
Rosane-Chawi Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2013
I am in art school, this is my fourth year in illustration, and I hate it so much, I am thinking of leaving art school.

The worst part is, it is expensive, and this year I won a scholarship so I can be able to continue my studies, I am always first in class...but on the inside I don't feel okay, I don't feel love towards what I do, and if I do something with love and put my heart into it, it gets cruelly criticized by my mentors, in illogical manners, that it discourages me and makes me lose all motivation and passion. I have had several heated arguments with my professors, not because I am stubborn, but because I do not accept criticism coming from a person who isn't capable of doing what I do (most of our teachers criticized just for the sake of it, and weren't artists at all, and if you don't believe me, I can show you their work and you will be surprised how those individuals are our teachers) 

I have been drawing since I was a baby, and I have always dreamed of becoming a cartoonist/artist and I always wanted to follow this dream, now I'm at art school, Im very deceived, as it teaches us how to be "adaptable illustrators" on the market, to be able to tackle many other projects (like multimedia, advertising, logo, design, animation) and I can't tolerate this program because I feel like it's driving me away from what I really want, and wasting my potential on trying to be good at 10 things while I just want to be excellent in one thing. Due to the lebanese market's demands our school is obliged to teach us to be versatile, but even with that illustrators, no matter how skilled they are, still don't get to work on things they love. 

Rejecting a scholarship might seem a stupid decision to the rest of the world, but I don't know why I can't seem to continue working with this system that wants me to be a machine that obeys clients. I put so much feelings into my work that I easily get upset when it is subjected to criticism or change. It's very hard for me to adapt to other people's views, I tried to be open about criticism last year, but I ended up following people's advice and listening to everyone and I became more and more lost and depressed. I am a very sensitive person/case as you may see, and it bothers me to see other illustrators leading a happy life, working shitty jobs for money, getting pissed at clients, but they don't get affected by it as much as I do. 


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:iconlushmindawolf:
LushmindaWolf Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
what art school did you go to? o.o
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Oct 6, 2013  Professional General Artist
Hi Rosane, first let me tell you I have been where you are 100%, having studied in Lebanon when there were even less choices for creative studies, so I know exactly your pain and I hope you'll understand the following advice comes from that place. I wanted to be an illustrator but had to study graphic design and it was 4 years of torture and being looked down on and my personal creativity completely inhibited. So if I wrote this article, it isn't because I had such a great art school experience but  in spite of the bad memories. It's very simple: Once you graduate, you can do whatever you like. You can enter the system briefly to put money aside so you can do your own thing, or you can go specialize in exactly what you want to excel in. Learn what they want you to learn and do what they want you to do because in itself, it's a very valuable skill to acquire, and rest assured that your potential will still be waiting for you when you're free to explore it. Unless you have an unconditional patron supporting you, it's very, very difficult to get anywhere creatively if you don't have all the things I list here that a school gives you – technical skills, references, networking, experience in getting jobs done you don't necessarily like. If on the other hand you can consider those difficult years as an investment, you'll be amazed at what opens up to you when you graduate. Again, I speak from experience. I refused to enter the system when I graduated, I lived off VERY random freelance jobs for years while I tried my hand at 1001 disciplines not taught in school, ended up living my dream of being a comic author (which I was able to do thanks to design skills learned in uni, even though in drawing/illustration I'm completely self-taught), and now I'm a calligrapher living and deepening my skills in London. Not one day goes by that I don't use something I learned in my major, even though I never worked as what they tried to make me and I just don't do graphic design anymore. I cunningly took what I could use and ran. I was still top of my class when I graduated, not that it matters because I never used my diploma or my CV to apply for a job ever.
One thing that I have to impress on you very seriously: I'm not surprised you're sensitive. It's perfectly understandable. But you have to learn to detach and not identify with your work. This isn't just for school. You will never, ever, ever, no matter how famous and established you get, ever experience your work not being criticized, and sometimes very meanly and stupidly. You have to learn to deal with criticism. It is important that you do what you want to do, I agree, and I don't advise forcing yourself to prostitute your creativity, but you have to accept that haters will hate, or people will innocently give their opinion not realizing it hurts, or skilled professionals will find faults in it that you can improve on, and none of the above means you or the work is no good. Accepting criticism doesn't mean acting on everything you're told, either, because not all of it will be worth listening to, and in the end you still have to hold the central thread. So I suggest this little check list that may help you decide what to do with feedback you receive.
1. What did I want to achieve in this work?
2a. Does this feedback help me achieve my purpose better, or is it telling me how to please someone else? (The former should always be listened to. For the latter see 2b.)
2b. Is pleasing this person more important than achieving my purpose? (eg. if it's the client that commissioned the work)
3a. Does this feedback express the personal opinion of a layman, or is it critique from someone who understands this field?
3b. If the former, does the layman's opinion matter? (eg a packaging design) If the latter, see 2a.
4. If I'm resistant to the feedback, is it pure resistance (don't want to redo the work, too attached to the way it is, etc) or because of a legitimate professional reason (feedback really irrelevant, I already thought of this and ruled it out, doesn't serve the final purpose...) It's important to be aware both of personal resistances and of legitimate reasons why you, the artist, are going to stick to your guns.

I really hope this helps you a bit. I took the time to give you a full answer because I have walked down this road and I know what you may find there!
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:iconrosane-chawi:
Rosane-Chawi Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2014
Thanks a lot for your great advice, sorry it took me so long to reply, but now that I am in summer break I could distance myself from everything happening and think clearly. I will continue this year and eventually graduate with my master's degree and do whatever I like, as you said :) 
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2014  Professional General Artist
That's great, good to hear!
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:iconcyfyr:
Cyfyr Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks for this. Ive been debating with myself on the subject of going to art school. I love making art, I love exploring through art, but its a different matter for me to be thinking about the business aspect of my art...  Its seen sometimes as a frivolous thing to spend so much money on, compared to say business or marketing or even a vocational school, so Ive been nervous to even consider it. But you give some solid points here. Ive thought along these lines before, but the presentation is so clear and blunt that it hit a little closer to home. 
Im still working on making my final choice on the matter, but this is further food for consideration. Thanks again 
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2013  Professional General Artist
Very glad it fills some gaps :) What really matters is to find out what one wants to do most: that is a decision one never ever regrets.
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:iconalikialii:
Alikialii Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2013
Im currently a biology major. I have two years of science and math under my belt and Im about to transfer to a four year school. Unfortunately I've only chosen this major because it is a science (makes money and is useful) and I have a very mild interest in it. Lately I've been considering art school. I ask myself what I would like to devote my life to. Our jobs define us when we're older. My dad is an engineer so that's the skill hes perfected. His "lifes work". But I know I want my "lifes work" to be about art.
I plan to continue with biology but I fear that when I am forty I will have nothing to show for my life. Although, I may just be to naive to know that bio is what I love.
Both options of art school or science school seem to limit me. I have to choose one and devote myself but I don't want to make the wrong choice. It's all driving me mad.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2013  Professional General Artist
All I can say is that taking the time to find out (such as a sabbatical year) is well-worth it, as this is a lifelong decision. I know too many people who approach the end of a career and know they missed out doing what they really loved because they didn't take a few months off to really think about it when they still could.
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:iconfrance75:
france75 Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2013
hi, it feels really good to read all that but i just can't make up my mind...  i'm french, just turned 27, got a first degree in communication at 21 and worked/interned in the cinema industry for almost 4 years. i was always given a chance to experience new fields  (editing/set photography/art department...)  but could never see myself sticking to any of them. i wanted to direct and i thought by doing that, i was getting all the skills and network that i needed but i ended up realizing i couldn't get myself to be doing my own stuff seriously, like something in the accomplishment of my creativity was not mature enough. i was obsessed with going to a good school of cinema but i was also scared that it would'nt be worth interupting my "professional" life.  So i spent 3 of those four years kinda trying to get in those schools but never really beeing sure of what i was doing and ending up not passing the admissions exams and screwing my chances to ever get in most of them because i was overaged. but i couldn't get rid of the idea that i was missing an important part of my self-devellopment so i ended up quitting my editing job for a small acting school (???!!!) telling myself it would allow me to learn actors direction which i did but still no sensation of creative accomplishment so i quit this school after 2 years of financial struggle, anxiety and boredom. and it leads me to now... still super frustrated with my education, still feel like i should learn more to be efficient professionally, still feel like i don't have what it takes to be a good artist and i've never producted so few. plus now i don't feel competitive for any of the fields i interned in.. i just found out there was a scenography degree that i could apply for this september in one of the top european art schools... (la cambre in belgium) it would mean starting a 4 years degree with people that mostly just got off high school (i've been there already and felt very lonely) i'm scared that it will be another disappointment and that i will never get a chance to get myself to do my own things... does it make me a crazy person?
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2013  Professional General Artist
Il me semble que le problème, c'est que tu ne sais pas vraiment ce que tu veux. Le mieux serait de prendre le temps de le découvrir...
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:iconfrance75:
france75 Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2013
je suis assez d'accord mais mon angoisse vient aussi de la sensation de ne pas avancer et donc de tourner en boucle...  je ne sais pas si attendre me donnera des reponses... la deadline de la remise des dossier d'inscription du concours est demain... il vaut peut-être mieux que je le fasse quand même...

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:iconfrance75:
france75 Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2013
Même si ça veut dire repousser l'école à l'an prochain? j'aurais 28 ans... ça fait tard non?
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2013  Professional General Artist
Qu'est-ce qui est le plus important?
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:iconfrance75:
france75 Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2013
au stade ou j'en suis, je dirais de faire... de m'y mettre vraiment et de sortir de ma tête! 
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:icondelphineapollo:
DelphineApollo Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Where do you go in order to get the skills required for an art school? I've tried reading books, looking through tutorials, watching videos and even going to both a community college and a state college but none of those helped. Each and every time I apply to an art school I get rejected.
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2013  Professional General Artist
Every school has its requirements so I can't answer that, one has to find out what the school they want requires and work towards that specifically.
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:iconirievairi:
IrieVairi Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2013  Student Filmographer
This is just what I needed to hear. Thank you for making this journal. I'm tired of hearing all those negative "art school is a waste of time and money" comments. Its only a waste of such if you aren't prepared to apply yourself and break the mold. It challenges artists and takes them to new heights in their careers. I'm heading to an art college this fall and I'm gearing up learn as much as I can and see where I can really take my art. :)
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:iconmajnouna:
Majnouna Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2013  Professional General Artist
That's the argument of people who can't/don't want to go to art school but still want to be taken seriously as "artists" or whatever. It's also about ego, not wanting to learn from others. That's their own issue. For someone motivated and eager to learn, art school is a horn of plenty that can keep giving years after you've graduated.
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